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    [title] => CVC Thermoset Specialties Develops Specialty Epoxy Resins that Improve Oil, Gas Pipeline Safety
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    [summary] => 
    [slug] => cvc-thermoset-specialties-develops-specialty-epoxy-resins-that-improve-oil-gas-pipeline-safety
    [body] => Pipelines are an efficient way to transport oil and natural gases.

Safety requirements are becoming more stringent as drilling underground reaches new levels and demand rises for laying pipelines in extreme cold and high-temperature environments.

CVC Thermoset Specialties has developed advanced materials to help pipeline engineers meet challenges such as corrosion, cathodic disbondment and high-temperature resistance.

Corrosion of buried pipelines is a leading cause of electrochemical reactions, which can lead to a loss of metal integrity. This can result in leaks, spills or even explosions.

To protect pipelines from corrosion, engineers rely on coverings and coatings made with HyPox CTBN-modified epoxy resins from CVC. HyPox resins are proven to improve cathodic disbondment and toughness properties at various temperatures when used in girth weld and in FBE coatings.

During fracking— a popular method for sourcing natural energy— oil and/or gas is released from the earth under high pressure and temperature. Coatings for fracking applications must withstand the high temperature and acidity of the materials flowing through the pipeline. CVC offers EPALLOY epoxy phenol novolacs for high-temperature- and chemical-resistant coatings, especially when sulfur-based acids are present.

Oil and gas pipelines must also be protected internally from solid particulates contained in oil and gas fluids like inorganic salts, partially polymerized oils, silicas, dirt, greases and acidic compounds.

As these particulates travel through pipelines, they become aggressively corrosive projectiles.

Coatings designed for internal pipeline applications must be engineered to be tough against the high abrasion created by these fast-moving particles. CVC’s EPALLOY product line also offers a range of epoxy phenol novolacs and THPE-based specialty epoxies with high Tg and high chemical resistance for such applications. [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-12-04 05:00:00 [updated_at] => 2019-12-03 14:25:38 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["317006","316179","322911","324036","322712","316331","317386","326228","326452","316136","317363","316423","325094","317095","324200"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-12-03 14:22:22 [contentType] => ContentType Object ( [className] => ContentType [content] => Array ( ) [taxonomy] => Array ( ) [listURL] => [logoUrl] => https: [id] => 2487 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => content_types [tag] => breaking_news [short_tag] => breaking_news [class_name] => [display_view] => [list_view] => [slug] => breaking-news [box_view] => [ignore_flag] => 0 [image_id] => 0 [layout_id] => 0 [formattedTag] => Breaking News ) [viewURL] => /contents/view_breaking-news/2019-12-04/cvc-thermoset-specialties-develops-specialty-epoxy-resins-that-improve-oil-gas-pipeline-safety/ [relatedArticles] => Array ( [0] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 316136 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 190228 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 190228 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Orion Engineered Carbons Expanding Gas Black Production Capacity at Cologne Plant [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => orion-engineered-carbons-expanding-gas-black-production-capacity-at-cologne-plant [body] =>
Orion Engineered Carbons S.A. announced that it will expand its production capacity for Gas Blacks at its Cologne (Kalscheuren), Germany, plant.
  
Orion is responding to the continuously growing global market for waterborne and solvent-borne coatings by debottlenecking its gas black production. 
 
“The expansion of capacity in Cologne is one more step in the rapid realignment of Orion’s portfolio toward higher value-added Carbon Blacks for specialty and technical rubber applications,” Orion CEO Corning Painter said. 
 
“Products from Cologne are shipped globally to customers in various high-end coatings and printing applications, including high jet automotive OEM and refinish, antistatic coatings as well as packaging and UV curing inks," added Dr. Sandra Niewiem, VP, Business Line Specialty Carbon Black. "This initiative reflects the high confidence of our customers in Orion’s products and technical support capabilities.”
 
[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-06-13 09:09:00 [updated_at] => 2019-06-13 09:13:33 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["315022","315829","304665","314629","307334","313616","311687","309206","309203","310205","310159","315661","307797","308989"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-06-13 09:03:38 ) [1] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 316179 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 190269 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 190269 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => LANXESS Presents Urethane-based Coating Systems at Latin American Coatings Show [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => lanxess-presents-urethane-based-coating-systems-at-latin-american-coatings-show [body] =>
At this year's Latin American Coatings Show (LACS) taking place at Centro Banamex in Mexico City from June 19-21, LANXESS Urethane Systems will present its comprehensive product portfolio for the coatings industry (located at distribution partner First Quality Chemicals - Booth 811-818). 
 
One focus will be on innovative raw materials for formulating aqueous and solvent-free systems for a wide range of applications, from glass fiber sizing and plastic coating to textile finishing and rotor blade coatings of wind turbines.
 
LANXESS’s "Low Free" products (<0.1 percent diisocyanate monomer content) based on aliphatic isocyanates, in particular, combine an outstanding property profile with the highest ecological and industrial hygiene standards. These Adiprene LF prepolymers are preferred in applications subjected to continuous exposure to environmental influences with high expectations in terms of durability and longevity; for example, outdoor waterproofing, protecting concrete for bridges, roofs, and balconies, and anti-corrosion coatings on metal.
 
“For high-end applications, like the protective coating of the leading edge of wind turbine rotor blades, this technology protects the rotor blades from the variety of stresses, such as UV radiation and erosion, and also provides the necessary flexibility/elasticity from a durable coating on a flexible and vibrating blade. In particular, the offshore sector is challenging because conducting the maintenance of the blades is highly complicated in this environment,” said Julie Chapelet, global strategic marketing manager at the LANXESS Urethane Systems business unit.
 
The Trixene Aqua range of water-based blocked isocyanate dispersions is an excellent crosslinker and adhesion promoter for aqueous coatings systems. They boost the chemical and mechanical resistance of coatings and sizing formulations to allow much better performance and durability in the final application. Due to the blocked isocyanate group, they are more stable as the respective free counterparts, and can easily be formulated in 1-K and 2-K systems together with a variety of complementary aqueous resins, e.g. hydroxy-functional acrylics, polyesters and urethanes.
 
This is beneficial for instance in textile processing where Trixene Aqua BI 220 can be used as an adhesion promoter for water-repellent finishes on sports and fashion clothing, delivering superior durability. Likewise, Trixene Aqua BI 201 can be used as a crosslinker for automotive clear coats, giving rise to improved chipping resistance and optical appearance.
 
LANXESS offers a full portfolio of water-based Witcobond polyurethane dispersions (PUD). Especially for the construction industry, PU acrylic hybrids (Witcobond A-100) are used as a top coat binder for wood flooring and concrete coating. By blending with Witcobond 386-03, its properties can be easily adjusted to meet the required flexibility and impact resistance of the final application. Witcobond products can be employed in a broad range of other applications, such as waterborne coatings and finishes for hard and flexible substrates. They include anionic, cationic and nonionic chemistry, so binders covering the full pH range are available.
 
Epoxy resins have excellent properties and are widely used in corrosion protection coatings and flooring applications. Due to their high mechanical rigidity, they can be brittle and tough, therefore they need to be flexibilized to suit specific applications. LANXESS’ Trixene blocked prepolymers readily react with standard amine hardeners used in 2K epoxy resin formulations, allowing permanent flexibilization of the end product. Specifically, our bio-based and nonylphenol-free Trixene BI 7774 improves flexibility and impact resistance of epoxy coatings, without compromising chemical resistance as well as addresses regulatory compliance.
[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-06-14 06:00:00 [updated_at] => 2019-06-13 13:05:17 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["304335","309801","312712","309501","311610","314911","315152","315208","313781","304452","310159"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-06-13 12:57:53 ) [2] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 316331 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2499 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 190450 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 190450 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Pigment Dispersions Market Worth $54.3 billion by 2024: MarketsandMarkets [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => pigment-dispersions-market-worth-543-billion-by-2024-marketsandmarkets [body] =>
According to the report "Pigment Dispersions Market by Pigment Type (Organic, Inorganic), Dispersion Type (Water-based, Solvent-based), Application (Paints & Coatings, Inks, Plastics), End-use industry (Building & Construction, Automotive), and Region - Global Forecast to 2024," the pigment dispersions market is projected to grow from USD $42.2 billion in 2019 to USD $54.3 billion by 2024, at a CAGR of 5.2%.
 
Building and construction is the largest end-use industry of pigment dispersions. This industry is growing in countries of the APAC region such as India, China, Japan, and South Korea. The huge investment in infrastructural projects in the APAC region is increasing the demand for paints and coatings in the building and construction industry. Pigment dispersions provide heat stability, chemical inertness, and weather and lightfastness properties.
 
Paints and coatings application is projected to lead the overall pigment dispersions market. Decorative coating is the largest and fastest-growing consumer of pigment dispersions in the paints and coatings application segment. The demand for decorative coatings is estimated to increase in the near future, owing to the increasing demand for paints & coatings in residential, commercial, and industrial construction. Pigment dispersions have low viscosity, quick drying, good weather fastness, good lightfastness, low migration, and solvent and bleeding fastness properties.
 
APAC is estimated to be the largest pigment dispersions market owing to the high consumption in paints and coatings applications. Growing population, increasing disposable incomes, urbanization, and changing lifestyles are driving the pigment dispersions market. China, India, Japan, Indonesia, and South Korea are some of the key pigment dispersions markets in the region. Recent infrastructure developments and industrialization activities in the emerging countries have opened new avenues and opportunities for pigment dispersions manufacturers.
[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-06-17 11:33:00 [updated_at] => 2019-06-17 11:34:03 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["306915","309037","309317","306119","311610","313817","312755","308168","312141","314436","305115","305490","309800","305924","307141","310207","311608","309203","313954"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-06-17 11:27:15 ) [3] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 316423 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 190517 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 190517 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => BASF, Lutianhua Plan to Pilot New Process that Significantly Reduces CO2 Emissions [short_title] => [summary] => Signed MoU to build pilot plant for new, energy-efficient one-step process in synthesizing dimethyl ether developed by BASF and Linde. [slug] => basf-lutianhua-plan-to-pilot-new-process-that-significantly-reduces-co2-emissions [body] => BASF and Sichuan Lutianhua Co., Ltd. signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to co-develop a pilot production plant that will significantly reduce carbon emissions and increase energy efficiency in producing dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas compared to the traditional process. DME is a methanol equivalent and can be used as an intermediate to produce lower olefins like ethylene and propylene. Currently, DME is produced via methanol as an intermediate from syngas.
 
According to the MoU, Lutianhua will invest and build the plant with a step-change technology that is developed by BASF and Linde. BASF will supply new, high-performance catalyst systems that enable one-step conversion of syngas to DME while Linde will provide its newly developed process design and engineering for direct DME synthesis. The pilot plant is planned to be built in 2020. The cooperation has been facilitated by the newly established Open Innovation Platform of China Petroleum and Chemical Industry Federation (CPCIF).
 
As a major chemical producer in China, Lutianhua is one of the first companies to adopt advanced technologies and techniques to produce synthetic ammonia and urea with natural gas as a raw material. “We have well-established production capabilities and are always keen to apply new technologies and processes,” said Tan Guangjun, Chairman of Lutianhua. “We are excited to work with BASF in making the production of key chemicals more environmentally friendly.”
 
The step-change process is enabled by the new, high-performance catalyst systems developed by BASF researchers. Linde’s novel process design is providing significant energy and CO2 emission reductions. BASF and Linde jointly developed the new direct DME synthesis technology over the past few years.
  [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-06-18 09:58:00 [updated_at] => 2019-06-18 09:58:41 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["311654","312921","305606","306615","314193","308841","314198","315431","306287","314622","311873","314735","305483","310825","308537","306600","306279","315025","310838"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-06-18 09:51:43 ) [4] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 317095 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2549 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => 2019-07-01 [author_name] => {"name":"Phil Phillips","title":"Contributing Editor"} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 191183 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 191183 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => The Economics of Carbon Capture Coatings [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => the-economics-of-carbon-capture-coatings [body] => I have been writing this column for 14 years. A guiding principle to which I have always attempted to apply to is giving the best business advice I could, based upon 40 years in the coatings, paints, adhesives and sealants industry. That advice from time to time has focused on disruptive technology that tends to evolve more quickly and somewhat uncontrollably than more mainstream advances stemming from mature technology. Even so, disruptive technologies must be prudently “rolled out,” meaning, of course, that while they necessarily do stir up the ROI opportunity (that’s why they are deemed disruptive), it is important to place the disruption into a reality framework. Typically, it is critical, even if on an accelerated timeframe, to carefully consider and thoroughly discuss political and industry headwinds in combination with realistic boundary guardrails. For readers of this column, I always want to avoid leaving them (you, my colleagues who must form the operational vanguard if this is to timely succeed) with any feeling of doubt that the key success objectives are possible to achieve.

That would be what I would normally advise. But, we are not in normal times. Regardless of why it’s happening or what’s causing it to happen, the amounts of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere are dramatically rising, and have not been at the level they are today (415 ppm atop the Maui observatory on March 2019), for over 800,000 years (yes, I’m that old and can remember those days). And, if the experts are right, there is very little time left to tackle this existential threat – that extremely limited rollout-time is measured in years at best, and is certainly not measured in decades.

So, when I was recently shown an albeit fledgling coatings technology with the potential to mitigate a large portion of the excess carbon dioxide being added annually to our atmosphere, I felt compelled to force myself out of my historically conservative and prudent comfort zone and into giving advice to my readers that breaks all my historic molds. When I realized that despite the critically short time left to mitigate the worst outcomes of this staggering excess of carbon dioxide, it is, in fact, specific types of coatings that have the almost entirely unique characteristic to be thinly applied over vast amounts of surface area and it is only that capacity of coatings that stands a chance of quickly defeating the huge task in front of us.

So, that’s what I’m going to do. I’m gonna stick my professional neck way, way out.

I have tried to tackle the job of projecting a business approach to such a huge venture. From the first, I could tell it was not a profits-and-losses calculus like I am used to conducting. For one thing, these new coatings produce products themselves – they literally capture and amass carbon dioxide – part of which is the very raw ingredients from which they themselves are made. They are in a very real sense the world’s first self-replicating paint. They don’t only protect and beautify the underlying surfaces, they make stuff that people will buy, including more binder raw materials from which they themselves are comprised.

When I began to dig deeper into the numbers and the logistics, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that these coatings had the potential not only to turn a profit upon their sale to the ultimate applicator/consumer as a classical coating, but to have potential beyond that to numerous markets for the products that they could themselves manufacture. These were intangible things like carbon offsets, but also tangible goods like carbohydrates, cellulose and high-end cosmetics and coating binders, fuel, animal feed, fertilizer...at this writing we are just now uncovering the multitude of potential byproducts and markets which lie before
our industry.

In this first Business Corner column devoted to the economics of carbon capture coatings applied over massively iterated vertical surfaces, I will describe my analytical approach, to be followed in a second such column by real dollar and cents analyses. This is my initial contribution to the industrial consortium we must form if we, as an industry, are going to kick carbon dioxide’s behind.

The approach I will take is to first do a standard supply-chain analysis similar to many I have discussed with you in the past.  I will necessarily have to throw in a wrinkle or two due to the fact that these coatings once fixed to surfaces amenable to sustaining the living organisms inside the film, in fact, begin making bi-products themselves thereby adding to the value chain.

In the end, however, I hope to take my conclusions and compare them to approaches being taken by other technologies to achieve similar drawdowns of greenhouse gases from our atmosphere. In particular, I will try to do an apples-to-apples comparison of my analyses with those used to rank carbon-removing technologies already being ranked by Project Drawdown, as recently summarized in the New York Times bestseller “Drawdown” edited by Dr. Paul Hawken.

The approach used in the analysis by Project Drawdown features a ranking of solutions according to their emission-reduction potential. 

The analysis concludes how many gigatons of greenhouse gases are avoided or removed from the atmosphere, as well as the total incremental cost to implement the solution, and the net cost or – in most cases – savings.  Because of the fact that 2050 has been estimated the year that we will cross over the 2 degree Celsius increase in global temperatures if we don’t reduce our carbon output leading to potentially catastrophic weather, loss of species, drought and global food shortages, the solutions are evaluated for their potential to impact that rise from over the next 30 years.  Thus, the degree to which a given solution has a bearing on greenhouse gases is translated into gigatons of carbon dioxide removed between the years of 2020 and 2050.  And what is a gigaton?  To appreciate its magnitude, imagine 400,000 Olympic-sized pools.  That is about a million metric tons of water, or one gigaton.  Now multiply that by 36, yielding 14,400,000 pools.  Thirty-six gigatons are the amount of carbon dioxide that was emitted in 2016.

Taking all this into consideration and by comparing Carbon Capture Coatings technology on the same basis as Drawdown to determine how it stacks up economically and feasibly to other Drawdown solutions, I hope to point to a near-term profitability path for the consortium partners.  If you would like to discuss this with me, please contact me, Phil Phillips, at www.chemarkconsulting.net.  [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-07-03 09:10:00 [updated_at] => 2019-06-28 09:16:43 [last_updated_author] => 142098 [uploaded_by] => 142069 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["317011","316992","316854","316189","316136","315735","313096","311246","310617","310274","310155","307623","306457","305100","304822","255369"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-06-28 09:04:09 ) ) [relatedContent] => Array ( [0] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 316136 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 190228 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 190228 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Orion Engineered Carbons Expanding Gas Black Production Capacity at Cologne Plant [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => orion-engineered-carbons-expanding-gas-black-production-capacity-at-cologne-plant [body] =>
Orion Engineered Carbons S.A. announced that it will expand its production capacity for Gas Blacks at its Cologne (Kalscheuren), Germany, plant.
  
Orion is responding to the continuously growing global market for waterborne and solvent-borne coatings by debottlenecking its gas black production. 
 
“The expansion of capacity in Cologne is one more step in the rapid realignment of Orion’s portfolio toward higher value-added Carbon Blacks for specialty and technical rubber applications,” Orion CEO Corning Painter said. 
 
“Products from Cologne are shipped globally to customers in various high-end coatings and printing applications, including high jet automotive OEM and refinish, antistatic coatings as well as packaging and UV curing inks," added Dr. Sandra Niewiem, VP, Business Line Specialty Carbon Black. "This initiative reflects the high confidence of our customers in Orion’s products and technical support capabilities.”
 
[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-06-13 09:09:00 [updated_at] => 2019-06-13 09:13:33 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["315022","315829","304665","314629","307334","313616","311687","309206","309203","310205","310159","315661","307797","308989"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-06-13 09:03:38 ) [1] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 316179 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 190269 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 190269 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => LANXESS Presents Urethane-based Coating Systems at Latin American Coatings Show [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => lanxess-presents-urethane-based-coating-systems-at-latin-american-coatings-show [body] =>
At this year's Latin American Coatings Show (LACS) taking place at Centro Banamex in Mexico City from June 19-21, LANXESS Urethane Systems will present its comprehensive product portfolio for the coatings industry (located at distribution partner First Quality Chemicals - Booth 811-818). 
 
One focus will be on innovative raw materials for formulating aqueous and solvent-free systems for a wide range of applications, from glass fiber sizing and plastic coating to textile finishing and rotor blade coatings of wind turbines.
 
LANXESS’s "Low Free" products (<0.1 percent diisocyanate monomer content) based on aliphatic isocyanates, in particular, combine an outstanding property profile with the highest ecological and industrial hygiene standards. These Adiprene LF prepolymers are preferred in applications subjected to continuous exposure to environmental influences with high expectations in terms of durability and longevity; for example, outdoor waterproofing, protecting concrete for bridges, roofs, and balconies, and anti-corrosion coatings on metal.
 
“For high-end applications, like the protective coating of the leading edge of wind turbine rotor blades, this technology protects the rotor blades from the variety of stresses, such as UV radiation and erosion, and also provides the necessary flexibility/elasticity from a durable coating on a flexible and vibrating blade. In particular, the offshore sector is challenging because conducting the maintenance of the blades is highly complicated in this environment,” said Julie Chapelet, global strategic marketing manager at the LANXESS Urethane Systems business unit.
 
The Trixene Aqua range of water-based blocked isocyanate dispersions is an excellent crosslinker and adhesion promoter for aqueous coatings systems. They boost the chemical and mechanical resistance of coatings and sizing formulations to allow much better performance and durability in the final application. Due to the blocked isocyanate group, they are more stable as the respective free counterparts, and can easily be formulated in 1-K and 2-K systems together with a variety of complementary aqueous resins, e.g. hydroxy-functional acrylics, polyesters and urethanes.
 
This is beneficial for instance in textile processing where Trixene Aqua BI 220 can be used as an adhesion promoter for water-repellent finishes on sports and fashion clothing, delivering superior durability. Likewise, Trixene Aqua BI 201 can be used as a crosslinker for automotive clear coats, giving rise to improved chipping resistance and optical appearance.
 
LANXESS offers a full portfolio of water-based Witcobond polyurethane dispersions (PUD). Especially for the construction industry, PU acrylic hybrids (Witcobond A-100) are used as a top coat binder for wood flooring and concrete coating. By blending with Witcobond 386-03, its properties can be easily adjusted to meet the required flexibility and impact resistance of the final application. Witcobond products can be employed in a broad range of other applications, such as waterborne coatings and finishes for hard and flexible substrates. They include anionic, cationic and nonionic chemistry, so binders covering the full pH range are available.
 
Epoxy resins have excellent properties and are widely used in corrosion protection coatings and flooring applications. Due to their high mechanical rigidity, they can be brittle and tough, therefore they need to be flexibilized to suit specific applications. LANXESS’ Trixene blocked prepolymers readily react with standard amine hardeners used in 2K epoxy resin formulations, allowing permanent flexibilization of the end product. Specifically, our bio-based and nonylphenol-free Trixene BI 7774 improves flexibility and impact resistance of epoxy coatings, without compromising chemical resistance as well as addresses regulatory compliance.
[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-06-14 06:00:00 [updated_at] => 2019-06-13 13:05:17 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["304335","309801","312712","309501","311610","314911","315152","315208","313781","304452","310159"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-06-13 12:57:53 ) [2] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 316331 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2499 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 190450 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 190450 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Pigment Dispersions Market Worth $54.3 billion by 2024: MarketsandMarkets [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => pigment-dispersions-market-worth-543-billion-by-2024-marketsandmarkets [body] =>
According to the report "Pigment Dispersions Market by Pigment Type (Organic, Inorganic), Dispersion Type (Water-based, Solvent-based), Application (Paints & Coatings, Inks, Plastics), End-use industry (Building & Construction, Automotive), and Region - Global Forecast to 2024," the pigment dispersions market is projected to grow from USD $42.2 billion in 2019 to USD $54.3 billion by 2024, at a CAGR of 5.2%.
 
Building and construction is the largest end-use industry of pigment dispersions. This industry is growing in countries of the APAC region such as India, China, Japan, and South Korea. The huge investment in infrastructural projects in the APAC region is increasing the demand for paints and coatings in the building and construction industry. Pigment dispersions provide heat stability, chemical inertness, and weather and lightfastness properties.
 
Paints and coatings application is projected to lead the overall pigment dispersions market. Decorative coating is the largest and fastest-growing consumer of pigment dispersions in the paints and coatings application segment. The demand for decorative coatings is estimated to increase in the near future, owing to the increasing demand for paints & coatings in residential, commercial, and industrial construction. Pigment dispersions have low viscosity, quick drying, good weather fastness, good lightfastness, low migration, and solvent and bleeding fastness properties.
 
APAC is estimated to be the largest pigment dispersions market owing to the high consumption in paints and coatings applications. Growing population, increasing disposable incomes, urbanization, and changing lifestyles are driving the pigment dispersions market. China, India, Japan, Indonesia, and South Korea are some of the key pigment dispersions markets in the region. Recent infrastructure developments and industrialization activities in the emerging countries have opened new avenues and opportunities for pigment dispersions manufacturers.
[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-06-17 11:33:00 [updated_at] => 2019-06-17 11:34:03 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["306915","309037","309317","306119","311610","313817","312755","308168","312141","314436","305115","305490","309800","305924","307141","310207","311608","309203","313954"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-06-17 11:27:15 ) [3] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 316423 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 190517 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 190517 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => BASF, Lutianhua Plan to Pilot New Process that Significantly Reduces CO2 Emissions [short_title] => [summary] => Signed MoU to build pilot plant for new, energy-efficient one-step process in synthesizing dimethyl ether developed by BASF and Linde. [slug] => basf-lutianhua-plan-to-pilot-new-process-that-significantly-reduces-co2-emissions [body] => BASF and Sichuan Lutianhua Co., Ltd. signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to co-develop a pilot production plant that will significantly reduce carbon emissions and increase energy efficiency in producing dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas compared to the traditional process. DME is a methanol equivalent and can be used as an intermediate to produce lower olefins like ethylene and propylene. Currently, DME is produced via methanol as an intermediate from syngas.
 
According to the MoU, Lutianhua will invest and build the plant with a step-change technology that is developed by BASF and Linde. BASF will supply new, high-performance catalyst systems that enable one-step conversion of syngas to DME while Linde will provide its newly developed process design and engineering for direct DME synthesis. The pilot plant is planned to be built in 2020. The cooperation has been facilitated by the newly established Open Innovation Platform of China Petroleum and Chemical Industry Federation (CPCIF).
 
As a major chemical producer in China, Lutianhua is one of the first companies to adopt advanced technologies and techniques to produce synthetic ammonia and urea with natural gas as a raw material. “We have well-established production capabilities and are always keen to apply new technologies and processes,” said Tan Guangjun, Chairman of Lutianhua. “We are excited to work with BASF in making the production of key chemicals more environmentally friendly.”
 
The step-change process is enabled by the new, high-performance catalyst systems developed by BASF researchers. Linde’s novel process design is providing significant energy and CO2 emission reductions. BASF and Linde jointly developed the new direct DME synthesis technology over the past few years.
  [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-06-18 09:58:00 [updated_at] => 2019-06-18 09:58:41 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["311654","312921","305606","306615","314193","308841","314198","315431","306287","314622","311873","314735","305483","310825","308537","306600","306279","315025","310838"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-06-18 09:51:43 ) [4] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 317095 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2549 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => 2019-07-01 [author_name] => {"name":"Phil Phillips","title":"Contributing Editor"} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 191183 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 191183 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => The Economics of Carbon Capture Coatings [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => the-economics-of-carbon-capture-coatings [body] => I have been writing this column for 14 years. A guiding principle to which I have always attempted to apply to is giving the best business advice I could, based upon 40 years in the coatings, paints, adhesives and sealants industry. That advice from time to time has focused on disruptive technology that tends to evolve more quickly and somewhat uncontrollably than more mainstream advances stemming from mature technology. Even so, disruptive technologies must be prudently “rolled out,” meaning, of course, that while they necessarily do stir up the ROI opportunity (that’s why they are deemed disruptive), it is important to place the disruption into a reality framework. Typically, it is critical, even if on an accelerated timeframe, to carefully consider and thoroughly discuss political and industry headwinds in combination with realistic boundary guardrails. For readers of this column, I always want to avoid leaving them (you, my colleagues who must form the operational vanguard if this is to timely succeed) with any feeling of doubt that the key success objectives are possible to achieve.

That would be what I would normally advise. But, we are not in normal times. Regardless of why it’s happening or what’s causing it to happen, the amounts of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere are dramatically rising, and have not been at the level they are today (415 ppm atop the Maui observatory on March 2019), for over 800,000 years (yes, I’m that old and can remember those days). And, if the experts are right, there is very little time left to tackle this existential threat – that extremely limited rollout-time is measured in years at best, and is certainly not measured in decades.

So, when I was recently shown an albeit fledgling coatings technology with the potential to mitigate a large portion of the excess carbon dioxide being added annually to our atmosphere, I felt compelled to force myself out of my historically conservative and prudent comfort zone and into giving advice to my readers that breaks all my historic molds. When I realized that despite the critically short time left to mitigate the worst outcomes of this staggering excess of carbon dioxide, it is, in fact, specific types of coatings that have the almost entirely unique characteristic to be thinly applied over vast amounts of surface area and it is only that capacity of coatings that stands a chance of quickly defeating the huge task in front of us.

So, that’s what I’m going to do. I’m gonna stick my professional neck way, way out.

I have tried to tackle the job of projecting a business approach to such a huge venture. From the first, I could tell it was not a profits-and-losses calculus like I am used to conducting. For one thing, these new coatings produce products themselves – they literally capture and amass carbon dioxide – part of which is the very raw ingredients from which they themselves are made. They are in a very real sense the world’s first self-replicating paint. They don’t only protect and beautify the underlying surfaces, they make stuff that people will buy, including more binder raw materials from which they themselves are comprised.

When I began to dig deeper into the numbers and the logistics, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that these coatings had the potential not only to turn a profit upon their sale to the ultimate applicator/consumer as a classical coating, but to have potential beyond that to numerous markets for the products that they could themselves manufacture. These were intangible things like carbon offsets, but also tangible goods like carbohydrates, cellulose and high-end cosmetics and coating binders, fuel, animal feed, fertilizer...at this writing we are just now uncovering the multitude of potential byproducts and markets which lie before
our industry.

In this first Business Corner column devoted to the economics of carbon capture coatings applied over massively iterated vertical surfaces, I will describe my analytical approach, to be followed in a second such column by real dollar and cents analyses. This is my initial contribution to the industrial consortium we must form if we, as an industry, are going to kick carbon dioxide’s behind.

The approach I will take is to first do a standard supply-chain analysis similar to many I have discussed with you in the past.  I will necessarily have to throw in a wrinkle or two due to the fact that these coatings once fixed to surfaces amenable to sustaining the living organisms inside the film, in fact, begin making bi-products themselves thereby adding to the value chain.

In the end, however, I hope to take my conclusions and compare them to approaches being taken by other technologies to achieve similar drawdowns of greenhouse gases from our atmosphere. In particular, I will try to do an apples-to-apples comparison of my analyses with those used to rank carbon-removing technologies already being ranked by Project Drawdown, as recently summarized in the New York Times bestseller “Drawdown” edited by Dr. Paul Hawken.

The approach used in the analysis by Project Drawdown features a ranking of solutions according to their emission-reduction potential. 

The analysis concludes how many gigatons of greenhouse gases are avoided or removed from the atmosphere, as well as the total incremental cost to implement the solution, and the net cost or – in most cases – savings.  Because of the fact that 2050 has been estimated the year that we will cross over the 2 degree Celsius increase in global temperatures if we don’t reduce our carbon output leading to potentially catastrophic weather, loss of species, drought and global food shortages, the solutions are evaluated for their potential to impact that rise from over the next 30 years.  Thus, the degree to which a given solution has a bearing on greenhouse gases is translated into gigatons of carbon dioxide removed between the years of 2020 and 2050.  And what is a gigaton?  To appreciate its magnitude, imagine 400,000 Olympic-sized pools.  That is about a million metric tons of water, or one gigaton.  Now multiply that by 36, yielding 14,400,000 pools.  Thirty-six gigatons are the amount of carbon dioxide that was emitted in 2016.

Taking all this into consideration and by comparing Carbon Capture Coatings technology on the same basis as Drawdown to determine how it stacks up economically and feasibly to other Drawdown solutions, I hope to point to a near-term profitability path for the consortium partners.  If you would like to discuss this with me, please contact me, Phil Phillips, at www.chemarkconsulting.net.  [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-07-03 09:10:00 [updated_at] => 2019-06-28 09:16:43 [last_updated_author] => 142098 [uploaded_by] => 142069 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["317011","316992","316854","316189","316136","315735","313096","311246","310617","310274","310155","307623","306457","305100","304822","255369"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-06-28 09:04:09 ) ) [contentTaxonomy_knowledge-center] => Array ( ) [relatedSearches] => Array ( [0] => Taxonomy Object ( [className] => Taxonomy [id] => 55208 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => taxonomy [taxonomy_tag] => chemical ) [1] => Taxonomy Object ( [className] => Taxonomy [id] => 56576 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => taxonomy [taxonomy_tag] => coatings ) ) [formattedTitle] => CVC Thermoset Specialties Develops Specialty Epoxy Resins That Improve Oil, Gas Pipeline Safety [taxonomy_keywords] => Array ( [0] => Taxonomy Object ( [className] => Taxonomy [id] => 55208 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => taxonomy [tag] => chemical [slug] => chemical [child_of] => 54554 ) [1] => Taxonomy Object ( [className] => Taxonomy [id] => 56576 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => taxonomy [tag] => coatings [slug] => coatings [child_of] => 54554 ) ) )