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    [title] => EuPIA Updates Suitability List of Photoinitiators, Photosynergists for Food Contact Materials
    [short_title] => 
    [summary] => Such as coatings, inks and varnishes for the non-contact side of food packaging.
    [slug] => eupia-updates-suitability-list-of-photoinitiators-photosynergists-for-food-contact-materials
    [body] => The European Printing Ink Association (EuPIA) updated its Suitability List of Photoinitiators and Photosynergists for Food Contact Materials which identifies the suitability of photoinitiators and photosynergists for use in printed food contact materials, such as coatings, inks and varnishes for the non-contact side of food packaging.

The list acts as part of EuPIA’s industry product stewardship program for brand owners and printers and provides a guideline of recommended raw materials that are deemed suitable for printing on sensitive product packaging, including food-safe products.

The Suitability List has been revised and adjusted to reflect changes in permitted migration limits and to remove previously listed materials which have become subject to EuPIA’s Exclusion Policy following their hazard reclassification as part of the REACH registration process. The list, which previously featured three tables, now has a simplified format and has been reduced to just one table, with more succinct definitions and descriptions.

EuPIA advises that in all cases the recommended materials should only be considered as suitable for use if their performance in inks and varnishes meets the migration limits defined in Annex 10 of the Swiss Packaging Inks Ordinance (SR 817.023.21) 01.05.2017 and that any Non-Intentionally Added Substances (NIAS) present can be proven to migrate below the level deemed to be acceptable for that material, based on EuPIA Guidance for Risk Assessment of Non-Intentionally Added Substances (NIAS) and Non-Listed Substances (NLS) in printing inks for food contact materials. Furthermore, the final measurement of migration compliance is the responsibility of the printer, in line with recognized converters’ good manufacturing practices, and the end-user.

“'Suitability List of Photoinitiators and Photosynergists for Food Contact Materials'” forms part of EuPIA’s product stewardship approach as an industry," said Dr. Martin Kanert, EuPIA’s executive manager. "By providing this updated, standardized set of guidelines, our intention is to support brand owners and printers by giving them peace of mind that they are complying with industry standards and ensuring that their packaging is ultimately safe for end-users.”  [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-08-14 08:50:00 [updated_at] => 2019-08-27 14:29:02 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["315431","316854","315735","311246","317910","320413","318937","309099","316992","314662","311314","255967","320669","309057","318744"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-08-14 08:43:26 [contentType] => ContentType Object ( [className] => ContentType [content] => Array ( ) [taxonomy] => Array ( ) [listURL] => [logoUrl] => https: [id] => 2487 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => content_types [tag] => breaking_news [short_tag] => breaking_news [class_name] => [display_view] => [list_view] => [slug] => breaking-news [box_view] => [ignore_flag] => 0 [image_id] => 0 [layout_id] => 0 [formattedTag] => Breaking News ) [viewURL] => /issues/2019-09-01/view_breaking-news/eupia-updates-suitability-list-of-photoinitiators-photosynergists-for-food-contact-materials/ [relatedArticles] => Array ( [0] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 255967 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2568 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 0 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => [banner_image] => 0 [title] => AQUAPEL [short_title] => [summary] => Aquapel can be used in a wide range of lithographic inks to control water pick up and thus increase color strength [slug] => aquapel [body] =>

Printing was originally done using limestone and an image drawn with oil, fat, or wax on the surface. The stone was treated with a mixture of acid and gum arabic, etching the portions that were not protected by the grease-based image. When the stone was then moistened, the etched areas retained water. An oil- based ink could then be applied and would be repelled by the water, sticking only to the original drawing. The ink would finally be transferred to the surface to be printed.

The modern offset process involves precise control of the water balance between the fountain solutionand the ink. Shamrock’s Aquapel products are designed to reduce water pick up by the ink to achieve agood print.

Product Description:

Aquapel can be used in a wide range of lithographic inks to control water pick up and thus increase color strength, reduce dot gain, and improve overall print quality. A hydrophobic additive to control water pickup in inks. Used in lithographic inks.

Application:

Aquapel is used in the ink industry. It is recommended for offset inks as a problem solver. Aquapel’s main benefit is to ensure a stable ink in water balance; especially for the long runs on high speed web presses. This product is a good stabilizer of the water pick-up in the ink on the image areas of the plate. It is also easy to uniformally disperse in paste inks. Recommended Level of Addition: Max 1%

DOWNLOAD TO LEARN MORE

[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-03-06 11:41:00 [updated_at] => 2019-04-17 09:17:59 [last_updated_author] => 348682 [uploaded_by] => 0 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["256669","256672","256670","255334","255333","256671","256679","256676","256379","256488","259140","311314","309057","300800","255369"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [1] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 309057 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2773 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => 2019-03-01 [author_name] => {"name":"Tianqi Liu and Koen Burger","title":"New Product Development, and Technical Service Manager, Cabot Corporation, Boston, MA, USA"} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 184095 [primary_image_old] => 0 [slider_image_id] => 184104 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Fumed Metal Oxide Dispersions Expand Aqueous Inkjet Printing Substrates [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => fumed-metal-oxide-dispersions-expand-aqueous-inkjet-printing-substrates [body] => Aqueous Inkjet Printing Challenges

Over the past twenty years, the printing industry landscape has been redefined by the digital information and communication revolution characterized by a reduction in personal and office printing and increased demand for commercial, signage and packaging printing. As the newest member of the printing technologies, Inkjet has exhibited performance advantages such as high-speed output, flexibility, and easy data processing and customization over traditional printing methods such as offset printing, making it better suited for this transition. In packaging printing, for example, the packages are not only product containers, but also an opportunity to influence customers’ purchasing decisions. The industry need for flexibility around changing the printed packaging for special events, seasonal changes and personalization often result in short print runs where inkjet offers the best cost structure without sacrificing speed and print quality.

There are three basic components in the inkjet printing process: printhead, ink and substrate. From the ink perspective, inkjet can be classified into three categories: solvent, aqueous and UV-curable. Solvent-based inkjet is typically used for applications where durability and scratch resistance are the most important performance requirements. In this process, the solvent “bites” into the substrate surface to anchor the inkjet colorants. The problems with solvent-based inks are solvent handing and work place safety.

UV-curable inkjet can be used on various substrates such as corrugated boards and plastics, however, there are safety and environmental concerns about residual acrylic monomers and photoinitiator migration across the substrate.

Aqueous inkjet ink is the most environmentally safe and user-friendly ink for inkjet printing. It has been adopted for non-plain paper substrates such as glossy offset papers or textiles. In the future expansion of aqueous inkjet in packaging, labels or signage applications, aqueous inkjet must work with even more challenging substrates ranging from very porous substrates such as corrugated boards and canvas, to non-porous and hard-to-adhere-to substrates, such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyolefins.

There are two major challenges for aqueous inkjet printing on non-paper substrates: liquid handling and fixation of inkjet pigments on the substrate surface. These challenges require that an inkjet receptive coating layer be placed on top of the non-paper substrates to help absorb inkjet liquid and immobilize inkjet pigments. Well-designed inkjet receptive coatings on a wide array of substrates need to work synergistically with an aqueous ink to achieve optimized print performance.

Fumed Metal Oxide Dispersions - Key Component in an Aqueous Inkjet Receptive Coating

Fumed silica and fumed alumina are high purity inorganic particles that are routinely used for applications in waterborne coating systems for improved hardness, abrasion resistance and rheology control. Unlike calcium carbonate or spherical colloidal silica, fumed silica and fumed alumina feature fractal structures with primary particles arranged into branched chains. The branched aggregate structures are not easy to pack closely, thereby creating intra- and inter-particle voids and channels. These voids or porosity generated by the fractal particles are very important to enable fixation of the pigment in an aqueous inkjet receptive coating. An aqueous ink typically contains around 60-75% water and 20-30% humectants and/or penetrants in liquid form. If the liquid portion of the ink is not absorbed by the receptive coating or not absorbed quickly enough, it can result in image quality issues such as mottling, inter-color bleed and wet smudge (Figure 1).

Although passing the image through a drying zone helps with liquid removal from the printing surface, an inkjet receptive coating is expected to do most of the work because the placement of the drying zone cannot be too close to the printheads or it may lead to ink drying and nozzle clogging issues. Traditional swellable polymer coatings such as starch (or cationic starch) or polyvinyl alcohol-based systems work by a much slower swelling mechanism and hence are not suitable for the high-speed requirement of many printing applications.

The absorption of liquid is strongly determined by pore volume distribution. Choosing fractal fumed metal oxides with different surface areas or particle chemical compositions (silica versus alumina), can lead to different pore volume versus pore size profiles (Figure 2). The particles in dispersion form are incorporated into a polyvinyl alcohol-based binder system in a 6:1 ratio.  Noteworthy is that Cabot’s fumed alumina dispersion (CAB-O-SPERSE® PG003 alumina dispersion) has low pore volume but a roughly bi-modal pore size distribution with a higher fraction of large-sized pores. The low surface area silica shows a similar pore size distribution to that of the PG003 dispersion. Conversely, the higher-surface-area silica shifts the high fraction of pores down to smaller pore diameters, but more volume is held in these smaller pores.

The pores generated in the coatings range from 20 to 150 nm in size. Dynamic fluid absorption in porous media is driven by the capillary pressure, which is inversely proportional to the pore size. Therefore, these nanometer size pores should allow for rapid ink liquid absorption. Typical inkjet colorants, which are 50-180 nm particles, can be partially drawn down into the pores due to capillary forces that act on the liquid. This may be useful for fixation of the colorant particles.

All commercial aqueous inkjet inks use anionically charged colorants, with pigments dominating the market. Without any mechanism of immobilizing the anionic pigments, they will move with the ink liquid on the printing surface, resulting in mottling issues (density variations) and smudge issues on non-porous substrates. Figure 3A shows an aqueous ink printed by Kyocera test bed on a PET substrate: the wetting and puddling issues are obvious, and the print can be easily smudged by fingers even after one week due to the presence of humectants. On very porous substrates such as canvas or some corrugated boards, the pigment particles, due to their nanometer size, will not be retained much on the surface, causing low optical density and feathering issues. As shown in Figure 4A, the color saturation is low on all secondary colors (blue, red and green), and is particularly weak on the composite black.

Untreated fumed silica has an isoelectric point around pH 2.5 and should therefore be anionically charged in typical coating formulations (pH 3-9). The wide range of pKas of surface silanol groups allow un-ionized silanol groups to interact with carboxylate or carboxylic acid groups (usually present on the color pigment surface) by proton transfer or hydrogen bonding.  In addition, our proprietary surface treatment can create cationic charges on the silica surface without the use of any cationic dispersants.  

Fumed alumina has an isoelectric point around pH 10 and should, therefore, be cationically charged in typical coating formulations (pH 3-9). When an inkjet receptive coating contains fumed alumina, its cationic surface interacts strongly with anionic pigment particles by electrostatic forces, trapping pigment in place and affording high saturation and minimum mottling (Figure 3B and 4B).  As mentioned above, there is a benefit to having fumed silica/fumed alumina in a coating to facilitate liquid intake and Figure 3C shows this effect through the finger smudge test on the prints after printing, even without any heating. The print shows quick drying within 80 seconds at room temperature. 
 
Fumed silica and fumed alumina can sometimes be difficult to work with because they exist as powdery agglomerates that are not easy to disperse into individual aggregates. As manufacturers of coatings continually face challenges associated with meeting stricter environmental standards, the transition from solvent to waterborne has gained momentum in the industry. We produce colloidally stable CAB-O-SPERSE® dispersions to simplify the waterborne coating process, eliminating the need for grinding and dust handling. These fumed silica/fumed alumina dispersions are available in a range of concentrations, particle sizes, surface charges and pH ranges. A schematic illustration of how these dispersions facilitate ease-of-manufacturing in a waterborne coating process is shown in Figure 5.

Dispersions Offer Stability and Flexibility in Waterborne Coatings

Fumed silica/fumed alumina dispersions lend themselves to coating applications due to the superior degree of dispersion down to the hundreds of nanometer level. The dispersions are very stable as indicated by their high zeta potentials in water (Figure 6). For example, anionic CAB-O-SPERSE® 4012K dispersion offers much better compatibility when mixed at 1:1 weight ratio with a polyvinyl alcohol solution, compared to a surface modified calcium carbonate dispersion, which precipitated out overnight (Figure 7).

The dispersions can maintain their distribution and state of dispersion during addition to latex formulations and during the drying process of a coating, when polymers begin to coalesce and entangle. The optical properties such as clarity or opacity can be tuned by adjusting the coating thickness or by the choice of particles featuring different sizes and surface areas. By virtue of their size, larger particles (e.g., CAB-O-SPERSE® 1030K dispersion) or those with lower specific surface area tend to scatter light more efficiently, generating more opaque coatings. Smaller particles with their higher specific surface area (e.g., the 4012K dispersion) tend to generate more “transparent” coatings. Figure 8 shows the same image under coatings made using the 1030K and 4012K dispersions with the same weight ratio to a polymer binder.

When it comes to cationic coating systems, our fumed alumina dispersions (PG003 and PG008 dispersions) are very robust against cationic polyurethane dispersions or acrylic dispersions. However, the interaction between cationic silica dispersion and cationic polymer latex can be complex. Polyurethane or acrylic dispersions exist in water as multiphase systems, mostly in the form of water-swollen colloidal particles composed of kinetically trapped polymer chains, with some small fraction as free soluble polymers. The partition between particle and soluble forms may shift due to the presence of solvent, surfactant and temperature change. The free chains can bridge silica particle surfaces to form loose agglomerates, leading to phase separation issues as shown in Figure 9. The strategy to eliminate the unfavorable particle resin interactions in such coating systems is to increase the surface cationic charge density, generating a more stable fumed silica system. Comparison between a low density cationic silica vs. a higher density cationic silica together with a cationic polyurethane in 1:1 weight ratio is shown in Figure 10. The higher density treated silica can maintain clarity and stability of the mixture, while low treatment density silica causes the formation of large agglomerates that eventually leads to precipitation or gelation in the system. 

Conclusions

As aqueous inkjet continues to take market shares from traditional printing techniques, it must expand its substrates from traditional office paper to a broader spectrum of substrates used for packaging, signage and labels. CAB-O-SPERSE® silica and alumina dispersions can help prime difficult substrates to work with aqueous inkjet inks because of the porosity they generate and their surface charge characteristics. These dispersions enable the formulation of precoats that can greatly enhance optimized image quality such as high color saturation, less mottle and wet smudge resistance. They also offer stability and flexibility in the waterborne coating systems. [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-03-08 13:17:00 [updated_at] => 2019-03-04 13:44:57 [last_updated_author] => 142098 [uploaded_by] => 142069 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["305680","305028","302850","302520","301408","301406","301400","301243","299560","299193","299066","299053","297030","296511","294846","294845"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [2] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 309099 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2486 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => 2019-03-01 [author_name] => {"name":"Anthony Locicero","title":"Associate Editor"} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 184167 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 184169 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => The European Coatings Show Preview [short_title] => [summary] => ECS 2019 to be held in Nuremberg, Germany, March 19-21. [slug] => the-european-coatings-show-preview-103544 [body] => The European Coatings Show (ECS) plus Adhesives, Sealants, Construction Chemicals is the leading exhibition for the international coating and paint industry and is held every two years.
The 2017 ECS attracted 1,135 exhibitors from 49 countries and 30,198 trade visitors – a new record – from around the globe.

The conference filled seven halls and offered more than 140 presentations.

“The number of exhibitors from abroad was more than 100 higher than at the previous event,” said Amanda Beyer, director event management at Vincentz Network. “This represented unusually strong growth in the international nature of the exhibition.”

The keynote speech at the Plenary Session was given by Renaud Nicolaÿ, a researcher from the École Supérieure de Physiques et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris who studies covalent bonds and their potential applications.

This year the ECS will take place March 19-21. 

European Coatings Conference

The European Coatings Conference will be held in conjunction with the ECS. The Conference, which takes place March 18-19, will offer an insight into the latest research results from scientific institutes and universities and information on changes in the market for raw materials, and will also provide an ideal opportunity to network with the recognized heavyweights in the sector.

It will feature 144 technical presentations. The schedule will be divided into 24 parallel sessions. The sessions will cover traditional topics such as pigments, powder coatings, waterborne coatings and architectural coatings, as well as topics from allied industries, such as printing inks, adhesives and sealants and construction chemicals.

The keynote speech in the plenary session will be given by Professor Markus Antonietti, managing director at the Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces. He will discuss the latest approaches and processes for the manufacture of monomers, solvents, plasticizers and hardenable oligomer systems from wood-like waste products. He will look at aspects including consideration of life cycle from the perspective of sustainability and will explain low-cost methods of extending the by-products bioethanol, lignin and sugar for the needs of the coatings industry.

Ten additional pre-congress tutorials on March 17. These optional courses will provide basic knowledge on the formulation of different paints and coatings and will offer an initial insight into trends like functionality and environmental protection.

European Coatings Show

The European Coatings Show will offer manufacturers of paints and coatings, adhesives, sealants, printing inks and constructions chemicals, suppliers of raw materials and industrial processors a unique platform to meet industry experts and learn about the latest technologies being offered for the paint and coating industry.

The ECS will expand to eight exhibition halls and will showcase the latest developments for the manufacture of paints and coatings. It will offer experts, decision-makers and visionaries even more space to share ideas with fellow professionals.

By expanding the venue, the organizers are responding to strong demand from the exhibiting companies, whose presentations include raw materials for paint, coating, sealant and adhesive manufacture, laboratory and manufacturing equipment, testing and measuring devices, and the associated services.

A key highlight at this year’s event includes:
• Spotlight on UV and UV-LED curing and sustainable formulations. Suppliers of raw materials for paints, printing inks and adhesives, and intermediate products for construction chemistry and the associated services will have their wares on display in six exhibition halls in 2019. Two more halls will bring together laboratory and production facilities, testing and measuring devices, and the fields of environmental protection and industrial safety.

For more information go to www.european-coatings-show.com.  [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-03-08 15:15:00 [updated_at] => 2019-03-04 15:19:04 [last_updated_author] => 142098 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["305677","304989","304194","303403","301411","301406","301150","300173","298939","296511","294822","294819","294818","294817","294815","242440","242436"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [3] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 311246 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 185911 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 185911 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Call for Papers for the International Coatings Congress (ABRAFATI 2019) [short_title] => [summary] => Event takes place Oct. 1-3, 2019. [slug] => call-for-papers-for-the-international-coatings-congress-abrafati-2019 [body] => The call for papers for the 16th International Coatings Congress is open. 
 
Researchers and scholars interested in sharing the latest research and findings can already submit their papers for review by the event’s Scientific Committee, which is part of ABRAFATI 2019.

This edition of the Congress is expected to feature a broad-ranging program, filled with innovative contents, to improve and build on what happened in previous years. Presentations are expected to include cutting-edge studies and the latest developments in coatings properties, raw materials, production processes, waste reuse and product life cycles, as well as many other topics involving opportunities to offer answers to requirements from both consumers and the various markets served by the industry.

To have their papers included in the schedule of lectures and the Poster Session, researchers are to submit abstracts in Portuguese, English or Spanish to the Congress Scientific Committee for review, together with their professional information.

For further information and to submit a paper, click here.
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The certification indicates that PPG Teslin-based labels printed with these systems will remain intact and legible when used on chemical drums and other packaging for hazardous materials shipped by sea.

BS 5609 is a four-part standard recognized internationally as verifying label durability, and it includes two key certifications. For Section 2 certification, which PPG Teslin label stock previously received, a base label must show good adhesive performance and dimensional stability after being immersed for three months in salt water. Testing for Section 3 assesses the legibility and print permanence of a base label printed with a specific print system. Together, the results of the two tests indicate a finished label’s durability after being subjected to weathering, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, temperature cycling and abrasion.

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) code and the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals require BS 5609 certification.

PPG’s tested label-stock construction, sold as PPG Teslin BS 5609-certified label stock, is one of four standard options the company offers.

"Toshiba is an industry leader in multi-function printers, and we are very pleased to have secured certification with these three Toshiba printing systems,” said Fabrizio Mandingorra, PPG segment manager, Teslin substrate products. “The BS 5609 certification gives Toshiba customers confidence that PPG Teslin label stock can provide their labels with reliable water, chemical and abrasion resistance to keep printed images and information secure in even the harshest conditions.”

PPG Teslin label stock is compatible with print technologies such as inkjet, laser, thermal transfer, flexographic and offset. It offers bubble-free application, and it reduces the potential for static discharge when liners are peeled from label stock – a process known to ignite chemical vapors in some manufacturing environments. The static-dissipative nature of PPG Teslin label stock also helps minimize static buildup during digital printing, thereby improving print quality and throughput. 
[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-04-03 05:00:00 [updated_at] => 2019-04-02 13:31:59 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["304192","303073","306116","302149","305211","305584","308450","299970","305170","299680","305279","305926","309367","307889","307823","309020","300745","301328","299686","299857"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) ) [relatedContent] => Array ( [0] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 255967 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2568 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 0 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => [banner_image] => 0 [title] => AQUAPEL [short_title] => [summary] => Aquapel can be used in a wide range of lithographic inks to control water pick up and thus increase color strength [slug] => aquapel [body] =>

Printing was originally done using limestone and an image drawn with oil, fat, or wax on the surface. The stone was treated with a mixture of acid and gum arabic, etching the portions that were not protected by the grease-based image. When the stone was then moistened, the etched areas retained water. An oil- based ink could then be applied and would be repelled by the water, sticking only to the original drawing. The ink would finally be transferred to the surface to be printed.

The modern offset process involves precise control of the water balance between the fountain solutionand the ink. Shamrock’s Aquapel products are designed to reduce water pick up by the ink to achieve agood print.

Product Description:

Aquapel can be used in a wide range of lithographic inks to control water pick up and thus increase color strength, reduce dot gain, and improve overall print quality. A hydrophobic additive to control water pickup in inks. Used in lithographic inks.

Application:

Aquapel is used in the ink industry. It is recommended for offset inks as a problem solver. Aquapel’s main benefit is to ensure a stable ink in water balance; especially for the long runs on high speed web presses. This product is a good stabilizer of the water pick-up in the ink on the image areas of the plate. It is also easy to uniformally disperse in paste inks. Recommended Level of Addition: Max 1%

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[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-03-06 11:41:00 [updated_at] => 2019-04-17 09:17:59 [last_updated_author] => 348682 [uploaded_by] => 0 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["256669","256672","256670","255334","255333","256671","256679","256676","256379","256488","259140","311314","309057","300800","255369"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [1] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 309057 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2773 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => 2019-03-01 [author_name] => {"name":"Tianqi Liu and Koen Burger","title":"New Product Development, and Technical Service Manager, Cabot Corporation, Boston, MA, USA"} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 184095 [primary_image_old] => 0 [slider_image_id] => 184104 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Fumed Metal Oxide Dispersions Expand Aqueous Inkjet Printing Substrates [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => fumed-metal-oxide-dispersions-expand-aqueous-inkjet-printing-substrates [body] => Aqueous Inkjet Printing Challenges

Over the past twenty years, the printing industry landscape has been redefined by the digital information and communication revolution characterized by a reduction in personal and office printing and increased demand for commercial, signage and packaging printing. As the newest member of the printing technologies, Inkjet has exhibited performance advantages such as high-speed output, flexibility, and easy data processing and customization over traditional printing methods such as offset printing, making it better suited for this transition. In packaging printing, for example, the packages are not only product containers, but also an opportunity to influence customers’ purchasing decisions. The industry need for flexibility around changing the printed packaging for special events, seasonal changes and personalization often result in short print runs where inkjet offers the best cost structure without sacrificing speed and print quality.

There are three basic components in the inkjet printing process: printhead, ink and substrate. From the ink perspective, inkjet can be classified into three categories: solvent, aqueous and UV-curable. Solvent-based inkjet is typically used for applications where durability and scratch resistance are the most important performance requirements. In this process, the solvent “bites” into the substrate surface to anchor the inkjet colorants. The problems with solvent-based inks are solvent handing and work place safety.

UV-curable inkjet can be used on various substrates such as corrugated boards and plastics, however, there are safety and environmental concerns about residual acrylic monomers and photoinitiator migration across the substrate.

Aqueous inkjet ink is the most environmentally safe and user-friendly ink for inkjet printing. It has been adopted for non-plain paper substrates such as glossy offset papers or textiles. In the future expansion of aqueous inkjet in packaging, labels or signage applications, aqueous inkjet must work with even more challenging substrates ranging from very porous substrates such as corrugated boards and canvas, to non-porous and hard-to-adhere-to substrates, such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyolefins.

There are two major challenges for aqueous inkjet printing on non-paper substrates: liquid handling and fixation of inkjet pigments on the substrate surface. These challenges require that an inkjet receptive coating layer be placed on top of the non-paper substrates to help absorb inkjet liquid and immobilize inkjet pigments. Well-designed inkjet receptive coatings on a wide array of substrates need to work synergistically with an aqueous ink to achieve optimized print performance.

Fumed Metal Oxide Dispersions - Key Component in an Aqueous Inkjet Receptive Coating

Fumed silica and fumed alumina are high purity inorganic particles that are routinely used for applications in waterborne coating systems for improved hardness, abrasion resistance and rheology control. Unlike calcium carbonate or spherical colloidal silica, fumed silica and fumed alumina feature fractal structures with primary particles arranged into branched chains. The branched aggregate structures are not easy to pack closely, thereby creating intra- and inter-particle voids and channels. These voids or porosity generated by the fractal particles are very important to enable fixation of the pigment in an aqueous inkjet receptive coating. An aqueous ink typically contains around 60-75% water and 20-30% humectants and/or penetrants in liquid form. If the liquid portion of the ink is not absorbed by the receptive coating or not absorbed quickly enough, it can result in image quality issues such as mottling, inter-color bleed and wet smudge (Figure 1).

Although passing the image through a drying zone helps with liquid removal from the printing surface, an inkjet receptive coating is expected to do most of the work because the placement of the drying zone cannot be too close to the printheads or it may lead to ink drying and nozzle clogging issues. Traditional swellable polymer coatings such as starch (or cationic starch) or polyvinyl alcohol-based systems work by a much slower swelling mechanism and hence are not suitable for the high-speed requirement of many printing applications.

The absorption of liquid is strongly determined by pore volume distribution. Choosing fractal fumed metal oxides with different surface areas or particle chemical compositions (silica versus alumina), can lead to different pore volume versus pore size profiles (Figure 2). The particles in dispersion form are incorporated into a polyvinyl alcohol-based binder system in a 6:1 ratio.  Noteworthy is that Cabot’s fumed alumina dispersion (CAB-O-SPERSE® PG003 alumina dispersion) has low pore volume but a roughly bi-modal pore size distribution with a higher fraction of large-sized pores. The low surface area silica shows a similar pore size distribution to that of the PG003 dispersion. Conversely, the higher-surface-area silica shifts the high fraction of pores down to smaller pore diameters, but more volume is held in these smaller pores.

The pores generated in the coatings range from 20 to 150 nm in size. Dynamic fluid absorption in porous media is driven by the capillary pressure, which is inversely proportional to the pore size. Therefore, these nanometer size pores should allow for rapid ink liquid absorption. Typical inkjet colorants, which are 50-180 nm particles, can be partially drawn down into the pores due to capillary forces that act on the liquid. This may be useful for fixation of the colorant particles.

All commercial aqueous inkjet inks use anionically charged colorants, with pigments dominating the market. Without any mechanism of immobilizing the anionic pigments, they will move with the ink liquid on the printing surface, resulting in mottling issues (density variations) and smudge issues on non-porous substrates. Figure 3A shows an aqueous ink printed by Kyocera test bed on a PET substrate: the wetting and puddling issues are obvious, and the print can be easily smudged by fingers even after one week due to the presence of humectants. On very porous substrates such as canvas or some corrugated boards, the pigment particles, due to their nanometer size, will not be retained much on the surface, causing low optical density and feathering issues. As shown in Figure 4A, the color saturation is low on all secondary colors (blue, red and green), and is particularly weak on the composite black.

Untreated fumed silica has an isoelectric point around pH 2.5 and should therefore be anionically charged in typical coating formulations (pH 3-9). The wide range of pKas of surface silanol groups allow un-ionized silanol groups to interact with carboxylate or carboxylic acid groups (usually present on the color pigment surface) by proton transfer or hydrogen bonding.  In addition, our proprietary surface treatment can create cationic charges on the silica surface without the use of any cationic dispersants.  

Fumed alumina has an isoelectric point around pH 10 and should, therefore, be cationically charged in typical coating formulations (pH 3-9). When an inkjet receptive coating contains fumed alumina, its cationic surface interacts strongly with anionic pigment particles by electrostatic forces, trapping pigment in place and affording high saturation and minimum mottling (Figure 3B and 4B).  As mentioned above, there is a benefit to having fumed silica/fumed alumina in a coating to facilitate liquid intake and Figure 3C shows this effect through the finger smudge test on the prints after printing, even without any heating. The print shows quick drying within 80 seconds at room temperature. 
 
Fumed silica and fumed alumina can sometimes be difficult to work with because they exist as powdery agglomerates that are not easy to disperse into individual aggregates. As manufacturers of coatings continually face challenges associated with meeting stricter environmental standards, the transition from solvent to waterborne has gained momentum in the industry. We produce colloidally stable CAB-O-SPERSE® dispersions to simplify the waterborne coating process, eliminating the need for grinding and dust handling. These fumed silica/fumed alumina dispersions are available in a range of concentrations, particle sizes, surface charges and pH ranges. A schematic illustration of how these dispersions facilitate ease-of-manufacturing in a waterborne coating process is shown in Figure 5.

Dispersions Offer Stability and Flexibility in Waterborne Coatings

Fumed silica/fumed alumina dispersions lend themselves to coating applications due to the superior degree of dispersion down to the hundreds of nanometer level. The dispersions are very stable as indicated by their high zeta potentials in water (Figure 6). For example, anionic CAB-O-SPERSE® 4012K dispersion offers much better compatibility when mixed at 1:1 weight ratio with a polyvinyl alcohol solution, compared to a surface modified calcium carbonate dispersion, which precipitated out overnight (Figure 7).

The dispersions can maintain their distribution and state of dispersion during addition to latex formulations and during the drying process of a coating, when polymers begin to coalesce and entangle. The optical properties such as clarity or opacity can be tuned by adjusting the coating thickness or by the choice of particles featuring different sizes and surface areas. By virtue of their size, larger particles (e.g., CAB-O-SPERSE® 1030K dispersion) or those with lower specific surface area tend to scatter light more efficiently, generating more opaque coatings. Smaller particles with their higher specific surface area (e.g., the 4012K dispersion) tend to generate more “transparent” coatings. Figure 8 shows the same image under coatings made using the 1030K and 4012K dispersions with the same weight ratio to a polymer binder.

When it comes to cationic coating systems, our fumed alumina dispersions (PG003 and PG008 dispersions) are very robust against cationic polyurethane dispersions or acrylic dispersions. However, the interaction between cationic silica dispersion and cationic polymer latex can be complex. Polyurethane or acrylic dispersions exist in water as multiphase systems, mostly in the form of water-swollen colloidal particles composed of kinetically trapped polymer chains, with some small fraction as free soluble polymers. The partition between particle and soluble forms may shift due to the presence of solvent, surfactant and temperature change. The free chains can bridge silica particle surfaces to form loose agglomerates, leading to phase separation issues as shown in Figure 9. The strategy to eliminate the unfavorable particle resin interactions in such coating systems is to increase the surface cationic charge density, generating a more stable fumed silica system. Comparison between a low density cationic silica vs. a higher density cationic silica together with a cationic polyurethane in 1:1 weight ratio is shown in Figure 10. The higher density treated silica can maintain clarity and stability of the mixture, while low treatment density silica causes the formation of large agglomerates that eventually leads to precipitation or gelation in the system. 

Conclusions

As aqueous inkjet continues to take market shares from traditional printing techniques, it must expand its substrates from traditional office paper to a broader spectrum of substrates used for packaging, signage and labels. CAB-O-SPERSE® silica and alumina dispersions can help prime difficult substrates to work with aqueous inkjet inks because of the porosity they generate and their surface charge characteristics. These dispersions enable the formulation of precoats that can greatly enhance optimized image quality such as high color saturation, less mottle and wet smudge resistance. They also offer stability and flexibility in the waterborne coating systems. [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-03-08 13:17:00 [updated_at] => 2019-03-04 13:44:57 [last_updated_author] => 142098 [uploaded_by] => 142069 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["305680","305028","302850","302520","301408","301406","301400","301243","299560","299193","299066","299053","297030","296511","294846","294845"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [2] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 309099 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2486 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => 2019-03-01 [author_name] => {"name":"Anthony Locicero","title":"Associate Editor"} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 184167 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 184169 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => The European Coatings Show Preview [short_title] => [summary] => ECS 2019 to be held in Nuremberg, Germany, March 19-21. [slug] => the-european-coatings-show-preview-103544 [body] => The European Coatings Show (ECS) plus Adhesives, Sealants, Construction Chemicals is the leading exhibition for the international coating and paint industry and is held every two years.
The 2017 ECS attracted 1,135 exhibitors from 49 countries and 30,198 trade visitors – a new record – from around the globe.

The conference filled seven halls and offered more than 140 presentations.

“The number of exhibitors from abroad was more than 100 higher than at the previous event,” said Amanda Beyer, director event management at Vincentz Network. “This represented unusually strong growth in the international nature of the exhibition.”

The keynote speech at the Plenary Session was given by Renaud Nicolaÿ, a researcher from the École Supérieure de Physiques et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris who studies covalent bonds and their potential applications.

This year the ECS will take place March 19-21. 

European Coatings Conference

The European Coatings Conference will be held in conjunction with the ECS. The Conference, which takes place March 18-19, will offer an insight into the latest research results from scientific institutes and universities and information on changes in the market for raw materials, and will also provide an ideal opportunity to network with the recognized heavyweights in the sector.

It will feature 144 technical presentations. The schedule will be divided into 24 parallel sessions. The sessions will cover traditional topics such as pigments, powder coatings, waterborne coatings and architectural coatings, as well as topics from allied industries, such as printing inks, adhesives and sealants and construction chemicals.

The keynote speech in the plenary session will be given by Professor Markus Antonietti, managing director at the Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces. He will discuss the latest approaches and processes for the manufacture of monomers, solvents, plasticizers and hardenable oligomer systems from wood-like waste products. He will look at aspects including consideration of life cycle from the perspective of sustainability and will explain low-cost methods of extending the by-products bioethanol, lignin and sugar for the needs of the coatings industry.

Ten additional pre-congress tutorials on March 17. These optional courses will provide basic knowledge on the formulation of different paints and coatings and will offer an initial insight into trends like functionality and environmental protection.

European Coatings Show

The European Coatings Show will offer manufacturers of paints and coatings, adhesives, sealants, printing inks and constructions chemicals, suppliers of raw materials and industrial processors a unique platform to meet industry experts and learn about the latest technologies being offered for the paint and coating industry.

The ECS will expand to eight exhibition halls and will showcase the latest developments for the manufacture of paints and coatings. It will offer experts, decision-makers and visionaries even more space to share ideas with fellow professionals.

By expanding the venue, the organizers are responding to strong demand from the exhibiting companies, whose presentations include raw materials for paint, coating, sealant and adhesive manufacture, laboratory and manufacturing equipment, testing and measuring devices, and the associated services.

A key highlight at this year’s event includes:
• Spotlight on UV and UV-LED curing and sustainable formulations. Suppliers of raw materials for paints, printing inks and adhesives, and intermediate products for construction chemistry and the associated services will have their wares on display in six exhibition halls in 2019. Two more halls will bring together laboratory and production facilities, testing and measuring devices, and the fields of environmental protection and industrial safety.

For more information go to www.european-coatings-show.com.  [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-03-08 15:15:00 [updated_at] => 2019-03-04 15:19:04 [last_updated_author] => 142098 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["305677","304989","304194","303403","301411","301406","301150","300173","298939","296511","294822","294819","294818","294817","294815","242440","242436"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [3] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 311246 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 185911 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 185911 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Call for Papers for the International Coatings Congress (ABRAFATI 2019) [short_title] => [summary] => Event takes place Oct. 1-3, 2019. [slug] => call-for-papers-for-the-international-coatings-congress-abrafati-2019 [body] => The call for papers for the 16th International Coatings Congress is open. 
 
Researchers and scholars interested in sharing the latest research and findings can already submit their papers for review by the event’s Scientific Committee, which is part of ABRAFATI 2019.

This edition of the Congress is expected to feature a broad-ranging program, filled with innovative contents, to improve and build on what happened in previous years. Presentations are expected to include cutting-edge studies and the latest developments in coatings properties, raw materials, production processes, waste reuse and product life cycles, as well as many other topics involving opportunities to offer answers to requirements from both consumers and the various markets served by the industry.

To have their papers included in the schedule of lectures and the Poster Session, researchers are to submit abstracts in Portuguese, English or Spanish to the Congress Scientific Committee for review, together with their professional information.

For further information and to submit a paper, click here.
[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-04-01 13:34:00 [updated_at] => 2019-04-01 15:22:36 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["301411","303132","303803","303212","303319","302742","304822","299763","303973","305677","311117","303384","305226","299694","309526"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [4] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 311314 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"","title":""} [magazine_id] => 5 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 186017 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 186017 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => PPG TESLIN Label Stock Used with 3 Toshiba Printing Systems Receives BS 5609 Certification [short_title] => [summary] => GHS-compliant labels now certified with Toshiba E-STUDIO models 3505AC, 2515AC, 3515AC. [slug] => ppg-teslin-label-stock-used-with-3-toshiba-printing-systems-receives-bs-5609-certification [body] => PPG announced that PPG TESLIN label stock used in combination with the Toshiba E-STUDIO 3505AC, e-STUDIO 2515AC and e-STUDIO 3515AC printing systems has achieved British Maritime Standard 5609 (BS 5609) Section 3 certification. 
 
The certification indicates that PPG Teslin-based labels printed with these systems will remain intact and legible when used on chemical drums and other packaging for hazardous materials shipped by sea.

BS 5609 is a four-part standard recognized internationally as verifying label durability, and it includes two key certifications. For Section 2 certification, which PPG Teslin label stock previously received, a base label must show good adhesive performance and dimensional stability after being immersed for three months in salt water. Testing for Section 3 assesses the legibility and print permanence of a base label printed with a specific print system. Together, the results of the two tests indicate a finished label’s durability after being subjected to weathering, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, temperature cycling and abrasion.

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) code and the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals require BS 5609 certification.

PPG’s tested label-stock construction, sold as PPG Teslin BS 5609-certified label stock, is one of four standard options the company offers.

"Toshiba is an industry leader in multi-function printers, and we are very pleased to have secured certification with these three Toshiba printing systems,” said Fabrizio Mandingorra, PPG segment manager, Teslin substrate products. “The BS 5609 certification gives Toshiba customers confidence that PPG Teslin label stock can provide their labels with reliable water, chemical and abrasion resistance to keep printed images and information secure in even the harshest conditions.”

PPG Teslin label stock is compatible with print technologies such as inkjet, laser, thermal transfer, flexographic and offset. It offers bubble-free application, and it reduces the potential for static discharge when liners are peeled from label stock – a process known to ignite chemical vapors in some manufacturing environments. The static-dissipative nature of PPG Teslin label stock also helps minimize static buildup during digital printing, thereby improving print quality and throughput. 
[views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-04-03 05:00:00 [updated_at] => 2019-04-02 13:31:59 [last_updated_author] => 228513 [uploaded_by] => 228513 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["304192","303073","306116","302149","305211","305584","308450","299970","305170","299680","305279","305926","309367","307889","307823","309020","300745","301328","299686","299857"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) ) [contentTaxonomy_knowledge-center] => Array ( ) [relatedSearches] => Array ( [0] => Taxonomy Object ( [className] => Taxonomy [id] => 56576 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => taxonomy [taxonomy_tag] => coatings ) ) [formattedTitle] => EuPIA Updates Suitability List Of Photoinitiators, Photosynergists For Food Contact Materials [taxonomy_keywords] => Array ( [0] => Taxonomy Object ( [className] => Taxonomy [id] => 56576 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => taxonomy [tag] => coatings [slug] => coatings [child_of] => 54554 ) ) )